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Enriching Your Live Archive
Entrepreneurial Couples Archive

Enriching Your Life!

Sign up for my FREE newsletter! Get practical tips for you and your family.

Archive - Entrepreneurial Couples Archive

Children, Business Trips, Self-Help

Friday, April 05, 2002


ARTICLES IN THIS ISSUE:

  • Don’t let fear prevent you from succession planning
  • Improving the creative process
  • Parenting Talented/Gifted Children

DON’T LET FEAR PREVENT YOU FROM SUCCESSION PLANNING

Fear of change, fear of loss, fear of death are all reasons that family/business owners fail to plan for tomorrow. But this is very immature behavior. Obviously succession planning should begin long before retirement or death. Why if other business people can deal with transition such as retirement and death, do family/business owners have so much trouble? For one thing family firm founders are more attached to their businesses than others. Family firm leaders seem to anguish over turning the power over to the next generation. In their minds it is a sign of aging and impending death. So they hang on until they die of a heart attack or are too elderly to do the emotional work of transition.

Ignoring death can be a sign of not investing enough time and energy in discovering your spiritual purpose. Research demonstrates that those people who are members of a religion and attend religious services regularly are less afraid of death. Apparently the emotional and psychological support of church/synagogue/temple membership is a powerful deterrent to depression and illness as well as contributing to more farsighted thinking. For more advice on how to plan for the welfare of your family and your business read my latest Families In Business article – INSERT HOTLINK.

IMPROVING THE CREATIVE PROCESS

Text Box: Thinking creatively is a process that you can develop and improve. Everyone is creative to some degree, however some individuals have a greater aptitude for creativity than others. This does not mean, however, that creativity is some mysterious and rare talent reserved for a select few. It is a distinct, sometimes illogical, way of looking at the world. The creative process depends on seeing relationships between things that others cannot see. For creativity to occur, chaos must exist, but it should be a chaos that can be structured and focused. The creative process usually involves the following four phases:

Phase 1: Background and Knowledge Accumulation - Successful creations are usually preceded by investigation and information gathering such as extensive reading, conversations, attendance at workshops, etc. This exploration gives a variety of perspectives on the problem, and it is particularly important to the entrepreneur, who needs a basic understanding of all aspects of the new product, service or business venture.

Phase 2: The Incubation Process - Creative individuals allow their subconscious to mull over the tremendous amounts of information they gathered during the preparation phase. This incubation process often occurs while they are engaged in activities totally unrelated to the subject. It happens even when they are sleeping, which accounts for the advice: "Why don't you sleep on it?" Getting away from a problem and letting the subconscious mind work on it often allows creativity to spring forth.

Phase 3: The Idea Experience - The third phase of the creative process is the most exciting because it is at this time that the individual discovers the idea or solution that he or she is seeking. These new and innovative ideas often emerge while the person is doing something unrelated.

Phase 4: Evaluation and Implementation - The fourth phase is the most difficult step of a creative endeavor because it requires courage, self-discipline, and perseverance. Successful entrepreneurs are able to identify the ideas that are workable and that they have skills to implement. More importantly, they don’t give up when they encounter temporary obstacles. Sometimes they will fail several times before they successfully develop their best ideas, and in some cases they may even take the idea in an entirely different direction.

* Suggestions taken from "Strategic Entrepreneurial Growth" Kuratko,Donald F. and Welsch, Harold P., Harcourt College Publishers, 2001, page(s) 153-156.

PARENTING TALENTED/GIFTED CHILDREN

  • Is your child intense?
  • Is he/she a perfectionist?
  • Has your child been identified by your school district as “gifted”?
  • Is your child an “underachiever”
  • Is your child a rebel?
  • Is your child a leader?
  • Does your child prefer adults or older children rather than same-age playmates?
  • Do you feel awkward talking about your child’s gifts to other parents?
  • Does your child “dumb-down” in order to fit in?

I will be facilitating a series of 10 classes on PARENTING TALENTED/GIFTED CHILDREN: Meeting Their Social and Emotional Needs. If you answered, “yes” to one or more of the questions listed above about your child you will probably benefit from attending these classes. The objective of the classes is to establish an environment where parents of talented children can receive support, guidance and professional advice through discussion with other parents and trained leaders. It will also help to develop parenting skills to nurture the self-concept and emotional development of talented children and their families. I will be using the SENG (Social and Emotional Needs of the Gifted) model developed by Arlene DeVries, M.S.E. and James T. Webb, Ph.D.

Please contact my office at (360) 256-0448 or (503) 222-6678 or via email at info@kmarshack.com for more information. We are planning on starting the series in May.

I enjoy getting feedback from readers about this newsletter. Please let me know if you’ve found particular topics we’ve shared to be of help or interest. You can also feel free to recommend topics for future newsletters. I look forward to your input – email me at news@kmarshack.com.

Thank you for subscribing to my newsletter. For more information on how entrepreneurial couples can make it work at work and at home go to my web site www.entrepreneurialcouples.com. You’ll find exercises, a library of family business articles, on-line consultation and much more. To contact my office call (360) 256-0448 or (503) 222-6678 or email info@kmarshack.com.