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Kathy Marshack News

A New Study Sheds Light on Asperger Syndrome and Hormone Levels

Thursday, April 09, 2009


A fascinating study at Bath University sheds some light on a possible reason why children with Asperger Syndrome (AS) have difficulties adjusting to change in their routine. Studies showed a low level of cortisol, a stress hormone, in children with AS. Normally, there is a surge in cortisol in the early morning hours, but that peak doesn’t occur for those with AS. Mark Bronson, a psychologist at Bath University, commented, "Although these are early days, we think this difference in stress hormone levels could be really significant in explaining why children with AS are less able to react and cope with unexpected change." Bath and Bristol Universities plan to continue researching why children with AS find more situations stressful than other children. This will help parents and teachers comprehend what is happening and enable them to avoid adding unnecessary stress to the child. For more information on this study, I recommend reading  an article on Psych Central entitled “New Theories of Autism, Asperger Syndrome”. Also visit my Frequently Asked Questions for more information on Asperger Syndrome.


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