CONTACT MY OFFICE:
(503) 222-6678 - Portland, Oregon
(360) 256-0448 Vancouver, Washington
   info@kmarshack.com

Therapy

ADD & ADHD
ADOPTIVE FAMILIES
ASPERGER & MARRIAGE
COUPLES IN BUSINESS
DEPRESSION & STRESS
ENTREPRENEURIAL LIFE
EXPAT ONLINE THERAPY
HIGH CONFLICT DIVORCE
MARRIAGE COUNSELING
MIND & BODY HEALTH
PARENTING
PERSONAL GROWTH
RECOMMENDED LINKS
NEWS CENTER
ONLINE STORE
Overview
ADD in Adults
Parenting a Child with ADD
Overview
Articles
Overview
Coping with Anxiety Disorders
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
Overcoming Depression
Managing Stress
Conquering Fears & Phobias
Overcoming Social Phobia
Overview
Couples at Work & Home
Dual Career Couples
Families in Business
Overview
Recognizing High Conflict Divorce
Overview
Conflict & Communication
Infidelity
Couples at Work & Home
Love, Sex & Intimacy
Maintaining Strong Marriage
Dual Career Couples
Codependence
Advice for Singles Only
Overview
Alcoholism Recovery
Stop Smoking
Weight Control
Headache Relief
Holistic Health
Managing Blood Pressure
Releasing Unresolved Stress
Overview
Am I a Good Parent
Blended Families
Gifted Child
Coping with ADD/ADHD
Adoptive Families
Overview
Gifted Adults
When to Seek Help
Psychotherapy Options
Laid-Off from Work
Overview
Calendar of Events
Media Coverage
Newsletter
Press Center
Seminars
Related New Stories
Subscribe
Sample
Enriching Your Live Archive
Entrepreneurial Couples Archive

Enriching Your Life!

Sign up for my FREE newsletter! Get practical tips for you and your family.

Kathy Marshack News

Discover Timeless Advice for Couples with the Entrepreneurial Spirit

Monday, November 06, 2017


Book cover - Entrepreneurial Couples Making It Work at Work and at HomeWhen I was growing up, entrepreneurship was out of the ordinary. The norm was that you’d get a job with a company and stay there until you retired.

Later when companies downsized and people lost their secure positions, many had to get creative and make jobs. The entrepreneurial lifestyle took off like a rocket. Men and women individually became entrepreneurs. But what really interested me was that men and women in romantic relationships ventured into the entrepreneurial arena together.

Over the years, these entrepreneurial couples have stumbled through the challenges without much of a roadmap. So they didn’t have a lot of wisdom to pass onto the next generation. They were still trying to figure it out by trial and error. Helping these couples that kept appearing in my office for marriage counseling is what motivated me to write my book in 1998, Entrepreneurial Couples Making It Work at Work and at Home.

What about the state of entrepreneurship today, almost 20 years later?

According to the Kaufmann Foundation, in their 2015 State of Entrepreneurship Study, baby boomers (born between 1946 and 1964) are twice as likely to launch a new business compared to millennials.

Baby boomers who worked for corporate America are turning to entrepreneurship rather than retiring. Many of them want to make a difference and do something meaningful with their lives. While others just need the income and they don’t want to work at Walmart or McDonalds. And now that the kids are gone and they’re empty nesters, many baby boomer couples want to spend time working together.

Statistics show that a smaller percentage of millennials (born between 1982 - 2004) and Gen X (born 1965-1984) are pursuing entrepreneurship. It’s not that Millennials don’t want to start their own businesses. A 2016 report from EY and the Economic Innovation Group found that 62 percent of millennials have considered starting their own business, but they can’t afford it (paying off student debts most likely).

What’s the trend for entrepreneurial couples?

According to the U.S. Bureau of the Census, 90 percent of American businesses are family-owned or controlled and Harvard Business School estimates that at least half of all companies in the US are family businesses. A study by National Federation of Independent Businesses reported that there are just over 1.2 million husband/wife business teams.

According to the Statistic Brain Research Institute:

 Percent of family owned businesses that remain in the family into the second generation 30%
Percent of family owned businesses that remain in the family into the third generation
 12%
Percent of family owned businesses that remain in the family into the fourth generation
 3%
Number of husband and wife teams running companies
 1,200,000
Percent of family owned businesses led by a female CEO or President
 24%
Percent of family owned businesses that indicated the next successor is a female
 31.3%
 Percent of family owned businesses that have women in top management positions  60%
 Percent of Fortune 500 businesses that are family-controlled  35%
 Average amount donated annually by a family run business  $50,000
Percent of family business owners that expect to retire by 2017
 40.3%
 Percent of those retiring who have not selected a successor  47%
 Percent of family business owners who have no estate plan beyond a will  31.4%

Why do family businesses and entrepreneurial couples fail?

Statistic Brain shows that 60% of failures are because of problems with communication and trust. 25% because of lack of preparation from the next generation. 15% because of all other issues like poor financial planning, legal advice and so forth.

The interest in family businesses and couples who run the business together has not diminished. That’s why I’m happy to release the second edition of my book, Entrepreneurial Couples - Making it Work at Work and at Home. You can get the paperback or kindle edition on Amazon.

Its timeless and proven wisdom is based on my years of working with entrepreneurial couples from many walks of life and business styles. I’ve seen their struggles and I’ve documented what does and doesn’t work. This book will help you get to know yourself and your partner on the deepest level possible, ensuring you can communicate what matters most to you.




Recent Posts RSS


Tags


Archive