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Kathy Marshack News

Have a Family Member with Asperger’s? How to Speak Aspergian

Monday, June 27, 2016


People with Asperger’s Syndrome have their own language – they speak in code words or have an unusual system of speech, but you can learn ways to connect.Have you ever tried to learn a foreign language? It takes a lot of hard work. To be able to think in another language oftentimes takes years of practice. The same is true with learning Aspergian.

Speaking Aspergian is a powerful tool in your relationship with someone who has Asperger’s Syndrome. It's not so much speaking the language of your Aspie as it is understanding theirs. With this understanding, you can neutralize everyone's distress. When you’re detached from the emotional meaning of the communication, it’s much easier to guide the conversation to a mutually agreeable place.

For example, Aspies don't have empathy. They positively hate it when I say this but it’s true. If your Aspie doesn't have all of the elements of empathy, it’s the same as Zero Degrees of Empathy as you well know. Your Aspie may have cognitive empathy, or a rather flat logical understanding of the facts, but they struggle to connect it to the emotional meaning. Or they may be highly sensitive and cry at the drop of the hat, but be unable to speak about their feelings. Or they may care deeply about a social justice or personal cause, but be unable to connect with others on the issue.

Disconnects between emotions and thoughts, no awareness of the intention behind human behaviors, using idiosyncratic words that carry no meaning for others, . . . these methods create a kind of language that can seem impenetrable. Autistic children seem to have a language of their own that no one can fathom. Autistic adults, even our high-functioning Aspies have the same unusual language patterns. Once we break the code, it’s much easier to communicate and relate.

Our next low cost Video Conference will be on the topic: How to Speak Aspergian. It will be held on Thursday, July 7, 2016 at 9:00 AM PDT and again on Thursday, July 28 at 3:00 PM PDT. There are still a few spots left, so if you’re a member of the Asperger Syndrome: Partners and Family of Adults with ASD please sign up soon to ensure you get your spot.

Bring examples of the mysterious language of your Aspie for our discussion. Even if your Aspie uses a different code word than another Aspie, the system they use is the same. But the real goal is more than understanding their code; it is also to reduce distress and find a way to connect with your loved ones.



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